Sean Ireton

Former UX / UI Designer

Posted in web

Fashion and web design are intentional and functional first, and aesthetically pleasing second (unlike art, which is unrestricted by parameters of usability and objective aesthetic pleasure).

Clothing exists to keep our bodies warm, protect us from the elements, but also to provide others with an idea of what we’re about by way of our individuality and self-expression. Websites are created to display an organization’s services, give information, and/or provide an interactive experience, all the while conveying the personality of the organization through design.

Design generates a subliminal effect that helps people understand what they’re looking at or how to use a product, though we rarely think about it or notice it. Design is necessary.

Looking at an ugly website can—but not always—evoke a feeling of being uncomfortable or that the business/organization is unprofessional. The same result occurs when you see someone enter a business meeting wearing a t-shirt, shorts, and flip-flops.

My point is that I love being intentional about how I dress and how I design a website. My knowledge of patterns, textures, layering and how to mix other elements can be seen through what I wear (seen to the right). This is very similar to how I design a website, where I use the same techniques to craft digital experiences.

I designed a mutli-layer dashboard system for an education software company’s product (seen to the bottom right). Obviously in the dashboard, I don’t use polka dot stars and plaid together because those patterns don’t suit the project, but the process of thoughtful styling still remains.

However you look at it, everything is relative to the self-expression of personality. Design needs to be employed to make sure the targeted emotional reaction is triggered and the set goal is achieved, whether that personality is demonstrated in fashion, or online.